Actress in the rough.

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The profession of acting has been maligned throughout the ages. The actor has been considered foolish not only when he was clowning on stage but even for having chosen to be an actor - a vagabond or hobo strolling through life without importance or worth. He has been denied burial ground and has been accused of prostitution and other varieties of immorality, egomania, vanity, ruthlessness, hypocrisy, toadyism, to name a few. Even when his gifts were recognized as extraordinary, his talent was looked upon as an accident of nature. When the public turned him into an idol, they treated him like some rare species behind bars. They poked into his private life and examined every detail of it with the audacity and curiosity they might have exhibited while watching monkeys at their most intimate moments in the zoo.

What If Love Scenes Make Your Mate Uneasy? →

I had this issue with the last guy I dated. He did not want me to do love scenes. His particular compromise was that if I were to kiss anyone in the script, the director would have to hire him.

Needless to say, we didn’t last very long.

However, I do agree that talking it over with your partner is essential whenever a role like this comes up.

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2 days ago
How Booking the Part is Like Landing Any Other Job →

Summing it up in a sentence: “You get the job, not your work.”

While this may seem frustrating to those of us who train (and train hard) it’s true that sometimes the crew will like a person so much, that they don’t care what his work looks like, or if he has experience. 

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3 days ago
We found the Wifi signal source!

We found the Wifi signal source!

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4 days ago
4 Plays That Every Actor Should Read →

What are four plays that you would recommend?

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5 days ago

Shameless Social Media Plug

Follow me, beetches!

Twitter: @daniellespell 

Facebook: Danielle Joy

Website: DanielleJoy.net

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6 days ago
Leave Your Outside Emotion Outside of Rehearsal →

Just a reminder that acting is a job, just like any other. Well, not JUST like any other. We rely on our emotions, and to fully feel our feelings always. But when you step into the audition or rehearsal room - use it or lose it!

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1 week ago
DIY Ken Burns Effect →

If you’re into this sort of thing, here’s an article on how to do it!

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1 week ago
Why You Shouldn't Listen to Naysayers →

I answered a question a few weeks back about not sending out head shots in a mass mailing. [here] It’s a waste of time and effort and most importantly, money. 

Secret Agent Man advises to send headshot and resumes via email (free, and it doesn’t take much time or effort). He also advises to take casting director workshops.

I’d like to add to this by saying, when you send out your headshot and resume, really research and target the agents, managers and casting directors that you want to reach.

For casting director workshops - really research who is currently casting what. If you are about to sign up to meet a casting director that hasn’t cast a project in three years, you’re better off saving your money.

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1 week ago
Why Agents Have to Be Picky →

It’s so refreshing to hear the other side of the story. I feel like we as actors sometimes take Agents for granted. They only make money if WE make money, so they have to be picky. 

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1 week ago
itsjustmylifeconfessions asked: Hi! 'm brazilian and I was wondering if to be an actor in the United States, Canada... you need some kind of document that proves that you ''can'' act. I mean, here in Brazil if you don't have a DRT you CAN'T work as an actor so you have to study for like 3 years to have one and finally get a job. So I was just wondering if you guys have the same ''rule'' for actors or not. Thanks for your attention :)


Answer:

Hello from the USA to Brazil!

I love international questions. It’s crazy all the different rules and regulations that each country imposes on actors. It’s as if the bureaucrats don’t want entertainment in their lives!

As a New York based actor that has a TON of international actor friends at the Tom Todoroff Studio- I can relate my experience working with them.

For the US:
You cannot work (anywhere) in the US without a “working VISA”. “Tourist VISAs” and “Student VISAs” do not allow you to work while you are in the states.

However, there are plenty of non-union roles to be had for small shorts and films by student filmmakers. They may not care if your not supposed to be working.

BUT- if you plan on moving here and plan on getting an agent, you have to be a crazy skilled actor. Or you have to have a talent that no one else can provide but you. Or you have to have a connection.

Otherwise, no agent will take you, nor will a casting director hire you. It’s costly for them to take a chance on an actor in this high-risk business.

That being said- the only requirement to be an actor in the US is skill. You do not need a degree or certificate. You don’t even need credits. But if you audition, and are the most believable in the part, you will get the role. That’s why I always stress training in my blog.

For Canada:
I don’t know how working/tourist/student VISAs work there, but I’d guess much the same way as the US.

But for Canada, I hear that everyone and their mother’s have an agent. So, your chances of getting representation there are higher.

I hope this helps! I may have gone a bit off-topic. I can only speak from my experience!

Xx Danielle

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1 week ago
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